The Human Resources Center
of Edgar and Clark Counties

 

Human Resources Center Corporate Headquarters

                                                                                                                                                                  

Home Services Locations Board Members PRIVACY POLICY Activities Calendar Employment Annual Report Café France Prevention CAMA The Giving Tree Staff Resources Imagination Library

 

 

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

Computer Wares

Eastern Illinois University

American Cancer Society

    

The Human Resources Center
of Edgar and Clark Counties

 

Human Resources Center Corporate Headquarters

                                                                                                                                                                  

Home Services Locations Board Members PRIVACY POLICY Activities Calendar Employment Annual Report Café France Prevention CAMA The Giving Tree Staff Resources Imagination Library

 

 

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

Computer Wares

Eastern Illinois University

American Cancer Society

    

  • artment of Human Services rk County Mental Health (708) Board ar County Mental Health (708) Board inois Department of Children and Family Services

  • CARF: The Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission for:

    • Employment Services

      • Comprehensive Vocational Evaluation Services

  • Medicare / Medicaid


Our Mission

Helping people help themselves through exceptional human service and community collaboration.


Our Vision

HRC is the premier provider of comprehensive behavioral healthcare in east central Illinois. HRC is a highly valued collaborator and a powerful agent for positive community change, recognized for its ethical and professional staff, therapeutic environment, innovative treatment approaches, and commitment to individual empowerment, growth, and recovery.


Company Profile

The Human Resources Center is a 501[c]3 not-for-profit agency which operates without discrimination as to race, sex,, disability, or national origin in the employment and promotion of staff, delivery of services, and the selection of board members. HRC receives funding from the Illinois Department of Human Services, the Community Mental Health Act (708), the United Way of Edgar County, Inc., various grants, and service fees. For more information contact Ken Polky at 217-465-4118.

The Human Resources Center was established in 1970 as a community center dedicated to helping the citizens of Edgar & Clark Counties.  For over thirty years, HRC has served the businesses and citizens of East Central Illinois and West Central Indiana and has offered a wide variety of rehabilitative services geared toward the issues and challenges that face our rural communities.

Message from the Executive Director Kenneth A. Polky

 

"The poorer one's socioeconomic conditions are, the higher one's risk is for mental disability and psychiatric hospitalization.” 

- Christopher G. Hudson, Ph.D.

 

Americans who cannot find jobs are four times more likely to experience severe mental-health issues (The National Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health America, 2009).  This not good news in view of current unemployment rates and the estimated 1.8 million Americans who have already given up on finding a job.  “The massiveness of this problem has not yet descended on the American public,” according to Dr. M. Harvey Brenner-- a John Hopkins University Professor who has conducted extensive research linking unemployment to increases in physical and psychological disorders.

Researchers have known for some time that joblessness, poverty and mental illness are correlated.  Numerous studies since the 1930’s have shown that the lower a person's socioeconomic status, the greater his chances of having a mental disorder. Yet determining “which comes first”--poverty or mental illness, is difficult to sort out and the relationship has long been assumed to be interactive.

 

A recently published seven-year study of 34,000 individuals conducted by Dr. Christopher G. Hudson of Salem State College suggests that poverty, acting through economic stressors such as unemployment and lack of affordable housing, is more likely to precede mental illness than the reverse.  Dr. Hudson's data shows mental illness to be three times as prevalent in low-income communities as in higher income ones.   Past studies have shown the rate to be anywhere from two to nine times higher in poor communities.

 

Kelly Anthony, Ph.D., a visiting assistant professor of social psychology at Wesleyan University believes that particularly in the United States, “relative poverty and dissatisfaction with one's lot in life compared to that of others correlate with mental illness.”

 

In particular, she suggests “psychological disturbances for which biological evidence is marginal, including moderate depression and anxiety, “might be more influenced by social conditions such as poverty.”

 

While there is considerable debate about the relative role of biological and environmental factors with specific forms of mental illness, the undeniably higher prevalence of mental illness in poor communities has implications for public policy and the allocation of behavioral healthcare resources.  Dr. Hudson  emphasizes  that "If the rate of mental illness in poor areas is two to nine times what it is in rich areas, then you need two to nine times the levels of servicing and funding in [poor] areas, which rarely happens.”

 

“Psychological services for the most vulnerable,” Dr. Hudson says, should be linked to “concrete services,” such as supported unemployment and living assistance. "It used to be that mental health workers didn't want to concern themselves with housing and unemployment," he says. "But this is starting to change."

 

For over 40 years HRC has been striving to make the best possible use of available resources to serve the community’s needs.  As Federal and State funding has decreased, we have responded by cutting administrative costs and focusing on employment services and recovery-oriented service innovations.  As highlighted in the Behavioral Healthcare Program Enhancements section of this report, HRC’s recently expanded client and consumer-driven supports are vehicles for moving an increasing number of individuals from poverty and dependency to recovery.  Individualized Placement Services (IPS) / Supported Employment and peer mentoring are part of our concerted effort to improve the well-being of the people of Edgar and Clark Counties, a task that often involves working with one individual and one employer at a time.

 

 

 

 

                                                              2009 Annual Report


24 HOUR CRISIS HOT LINE 1-866-567-2400

Contact Information

 Paris                                                                     Marshall                                

Telephone                                                           Telephone                                        

217.465.4118                                                       217.826.6212

FAX                                                                         FAX                                                          217.463.1899                                                       217.826.3682                      

Postal Address
PO Box 1118
Paris, Illinois 61944

Physical Address                
118 East Court Street                                           1006 South 6th     

Paris, IL 61944                                                       Marshall, IL 62441                

Electronic mail
General Information: Kenneth Polky, Executive Director
Client Support: Starr Nelson, Director of Operations
Billing Questions: Rita Haupt, Data & Billing Manager